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Huang Says That Nvidia GPUs Will Replace CPUs In Future, Moore’s Law is Dead

Nvidia founder and CEO Jensen Huang showed gratitude, up on receiving support, from China’s top-five A.I players. He was talking with the crowd gathered at GPU Technology Conference (GTC) 2017, that happened in Beijing, China. Huang publicly claimed that Moore’s law has been nullified.

Moore’s Law refers to an observation made by Intel’s co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965. He claimed that the number of transistors per square inch on I.Cs doubles every year since their invention. He predicted that this trend will continue in the future as well.

moore's law

Huang said, this era is beyond Moore’s Law since the CPU transistors have grown at a pace of 50 percent annually, the performance improved is by 10 percent only. He further added that designers can hardly work out, advanced parallel-instruction architectures for CPU and therefore, GPUs will soon replace CPUs.

Intel said the opposite, at one of its Technology and Manufacturing conference in Beijing; when it revealed certain details about its 10nm process.

Huang said that Nvidia GPUs will replace CPUs due to the fact that its computational capacities have grown tremendously over the years and is the ideal solution for AI based applications.

He disclosed that Alibaba, Baidu, Tencent, JD.com and iFLYTEK, top 5 ecommerce players in China, have adopted Nvidia Volta GPU architectures to support cloud services, while Huawei, Inspur and Lenovo have deployed HGX-based GPU servers.

At the conference, Nvidia showcased its latest product TensorRT3, that can be programmed to incredibly boost performance without the overwhelming costs of cloud services and maintaining data centers.

Currently the company is teaming up with Huawei, Lenovo and Inspur to develop the Tesla 100 HGX-1 accelerator. This GPU based server can outperform traditional CPU servers in terms of operational efficiency, handling, voice, speech and image recognition. Cherry on top would be that these servers cost one fifth of a traditional CPU server.