Activision Wants Player-Defined Games That Run For Limited Time Periods

Activision is considering a way for players to experience new games by giving them the freedom to create their very own personalized and customized demos.

The idea is to design games with certain checkpoints so that players can try them out according to their preferences before making a full purchase. Hence, players would be able to choose a particular portion to play from the game, the number of available characters and opponents, the allowed items and abilities, the difficulty levels, and the number of hours allowed before the player-defined demo expires—all presumably based on a price point that adjusts to the player-curation.

In a recently published patent, Activision notes how many players continue to face time and funding constraints when picking out new games to play. Even if games are purchased at full price, players may be discouraged from playing or completing the game due to the aforementioned reasons. Hence, there needs to be a way for players to ascertain whether a game warrants a full purchase that goes beyond the standard trial period or demo from developers.

The present specifications describes systems and methods for customizing a video game to a player defined time period. Content units of a video game are selected based on at least one of multiple predefined criteria. Content units are then edited to fit into the player defined period. Game gear required for playing the selected content units is determined. The edited content units and the selected game gear are provided to the player to play within the player defined time period.

The proposed idea from Activision holds some merit at certain levels. Imagine paying a small fee to create a demo of a game based on a boss fight that a friend has been praising for days, or trying out new characters in a multiplayer game without having to pay the full fee. Such design though, will fall onto the developers and fair to say, not all games can be curated on such a large scale. Spoilers, for example, will naturally be a concern in narrative-based and story-driven games.