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Team Dignitas Has Reportedly Been Rejected for the New Franchised NA LCS

Team Dignitas, one of the oldest and storied esports organizations in League of Legends, may have to reconsider its competitive representation for next year.

According to a report from ESPN, Riot Games has been notifying applicants in the last week that their applications for the franchised North American League Championship Series (NA LCS) have been rejected. This list is said to include more than one organization that is part of the current season. Team Dignitas is apparently the first to have been denied the opportunity to return next year.

More than a hundred applications have so far been submitted to Riot Games, from which the company is only going to accept ten for the inaugural season. The cost of entry and sustaining a brand is one of the profound demands of creating and managing a franchise. While most endemic organizations might fall short in terms of affordability, Team Dignitas was acquired by the Philadelphia 76ers last year. The increased funding and support for expansion should have worked in favor.

It remains unknown as to why Team Dignitas was rejected by Riot Games. Perhaps other organizations had better potential in terms of success that will cast a better light on the NA LCS.

“Team Dignitas will be entered into a pool for compensation for an exit fee, alongside the other teams that participated in the 2017 Summer League Championship Series and Challenger Series split,” the report further adds. It will be rewarded a minimum of six shares in that pool, three for each split since Dignitas’ ownership change in fall 2016.

Provided that the sources are legitimate, Team Dignitas might not return for the next season. It might opt to jump regions or release its roster for League of Legends.

Most recently, majority owner Joe Lacob and assistant general manager Kirk Lacob of the Golden State Warriors in the National Basketball Association (NBA) have reportedly been accepted by Riot Games as its newest franchise owner in North America.