Random House Working on an Interactive Fiction Free-To-Play Game

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Random House Working on an Interactive Fiction Free-To-Play Game

blackcrown
Book publisher giant Random House seems to have had its share of dictionaries and comics, and is now turning to the wild and not-so-explored world interactive fiction.

The New York-based company is currently in process of what is termed as the ‘Black Crown Project’, which involves creating an online interactive narrative game called Black Crown.

The narrative title is aptly tagged as ‘free-to-play’ because it is, but certain story-related content can be accessed with virtual currency, which can be acquired by real-life payment, a feature widely observed in majority of games belonging to the genre.

The minimalistic but very  intriguing website automatically piques interest of viewers that are searching for a different gaming experience. The game is currently in development, but users can still participate in a very unorthodox registering process.

The game’s registration is a bit eerie, as it’ll throw odd questions (and subsequent odd options to choose from) at you that include the inquiry of your age, gender, how far/close you stand to an individual while speaking to them, and other oddities that will make you scratch your head a bit.

The statements, questions, and the style of writing somewhat hint out the contents of the story itself. The game appears to be set in the 19th century timeline, and the final question references John Snow (not the Game of Thrones one, that’s Jon Snow) and William Far, two disease researchers that were prominent figures in their field in the 1800s.

From what I can dissect, the gas-mask logo and the peculiarity of the questions and references indicate a story that more or less concerns epidemiology and disease control.

The author of the story isn’t being revealed yet, but the website indicates that he/she is a debut writer, and the appellation will be revealed once the game goes live.

It’s hard to ignore this artistic literature work, and I’ll probably be checking back again regularly to see if there are more silly questions to answer and deeper dwellings to go into.