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Sony Publishes New Anti-Piracy Patent – Will Be Based Upon Loading Times

On the topic of piracy the PlayStation 3 has enjoyed a significant time countering the production and distribution of illegal software copies. With the recent announcement of the new PlayStation 4, Sony is once again bringing out the big guns to protect their investment.

A recent patent published by Sony has been spotted which would check the loading time of games. The console would compare the times to a set benchmark and if the loading time differentiates, the game will not be loaded.

Here’s an excerpt from the patent which explains the process in detail:

1. A method for validating legitimate media products associated with a legitimate media type, the method comprising: loading a first media product having a first media type on a computing device; measuring a first load time for the first media product on the computing device; establishing a threshold range of acceptable first load times using a second load time associated with the legitimate media type; and determining whether the first load time is within the threshold range.

17. A system for validating legitimate media products associated with a legitimate media type, the system comprising: a computing device that loads a first media product having a first media type and that measures a first load time for the first media product; a processor that calculates a second load time for the legitimate media type, establishes a threshold range of acceptable first load times using the second load time, and determines whether the first load time is within the threshold range; and a memory coupled to the processor.

The patent was filed back in August of 2011 but was only recently published. It’s highly probable that the technology will make its way to the PlayStation 4.

Assuming that everything goes fine, the new anti-piracy measures would greatly reduce the amount of piracy in Sony’s circle. It would be great to see Microsoft adopt something similar as well. It would eventually make a lot of developers happy and off course would mean the end of the much controversial DRM solution.

[via DarkZero]