Gamer’s Block: Why Is It Becoming Increasingly Common To Lose Motivation To Play Games

By   /   May 22, 2017
GAMER'S BLOCK

Similar to a writer’s block, once in a while every gamer experiences the same thing in the form of a gamer’s block where they end up losing motivation to play games. Whether it is towards singleplayer/multiplayer games or towards all games, it will inevitably hit every avid gamer at least once in their life.

Given the “solo” nature of singleplayer games without no one to talk to and laugh around with, it can be common among people who mostly play singleplayer games making it difficult for them to fully commit to one game or even getting the motivation to play anything at all. So what could be the root cause of this issue? After all, if someone has spent a decent amount of money buying a game, why is it that they cannot seem to bring themselves to play and enjoy the game even if it is a decent and well-reviewed game?

So what could be the root cause of this issue? After all, if someone has spent a decent amount of money buying a game, why is it that they cannot seem to bring themselves to play and enjoy the game even if it is a decent and well-reviewed title?

The problem could lie with something as simple as just following the gaming news and giving into the hype created by developers prior to every release in order to sell more copies. The constant cycle of new game releases, getting excited about those releases, buying the games and then trying to finish them before another interesting game comes out can take its toll on gamers.

If a person is solely focusing on gaming as their favorite past time, that could also factor in as following the same routine daily of playing a singleplayer game for 3-4 hours can contribute to the slump, taking away all motivation. It doesn’t help matters that games these days feel a lot like reskins of old games with little to no new addition and value.

Another contributing factor, especially in the case of single-player games could be the expectations gamers put on games combined with the bar set by some developers. A great example of this is The Witcher 3, which even after 2 years of release is considered by many as the best RPG to date.

Playing such a perfect game for 100 hours makes it difficult for gamers to go back to something even slightly less than what the quality set forth by CDPR’s game was. The open world games formula adopted by every game these days also contributes to this thanks to the way it encourages “things to do behavior” with hundreds of side quests with most of them only useful for providing some basic loot and experience and not any actual meaningful content.

Playing such a perfect game for 100 hours makes it difficult for gamers to go back to something even slightly less than what the quality set forth by CDPR’s game was. The open world games formula adopted by every game these days also contributes to this thanks to the way it encourages “things to do behavior” with hundreds of side quests with most of them only useful for providing some basic loot and experience and not any actual meaningful content.

The always rotating seasons of game sales on digital stores including Steam’s seasonal sales as well as PSN and XBL’s regular sales further contribute to the problem as seeing an AAA title going for 50-75% can be quite enticing, forcing games to buy the game and building up a backlog.

A huge backlog means players will never find the time to finish a certain game which results in them thinking they shouldn’t play a game at all if they can’t finish it. The completionist in most of us further compounds this problem, forcing gamers to stick with a game for as long as possible in order to not only get 100% completion but also work towards all trophies and achievements for a cool looking digital badge.

The issue is less prevalent when it comes to multiplayer games. Instead of sitting down and playing for 3-4 hours at a stretch to make some progress in a game that is 50+ hours, gamers can simply play a match or two in a multiplayer game to unwind.

All it takes is an hour and after that, they can resume their normal daily activities or simply switch games. The ever-increasing amount of multiplayer games available in the market, many of them free to play, seem to entice players especially those with limited free time.

Even if such a player gets a couple of hours a day, they feel like it would be better to spend those in an online game with friends rather than just go on a single player adventure which in most cases can be underwhelming and they will simply forget about it after a while.

So what can be done to solve this problem and get rid of the gamers block? The first step I think should be to figure out a counter for sales. No matter how good a game’s price might seem, players should only purchase those they are absolutely sure they will start playing as soon as they complete the purchase and put on download. This way, there will be no backlog to worry about and even if there is already a backlog, it should be completely ignored, a clean slate if you will. Simply taking a break from gaming for a short while and focusing on other hobbies can also work. When I was experiencing similar motivation issues, I simply stopped playing games for a few weeks, focused on catching up on movies, TV shows, and some light reading.

Within a month, the craving to start playing games arose again and I picked up a singleplayer game I had been putting off for a while and managed to finish it over the weekend, something which I had failed at for months prior to taking a break.

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