Why Professional League of Legends Players Are Intentionally Disconnecting

By   /   Mar 21, 2017

Several League of Legends players from South Korea have been intentionally disconnecting from their professional games before they are concluded.

Riot Games has stern rules against doing so; all players from both teams are to remain in the game until a Nexus is destroyed. However, as we have to come to see in recent weeks, several players have made it a habit to disconnect themselves from their professional games just seconds before conclusion.

Longzhu Gaming, Samsung Galaxy, and Afreeca Freecs have all been reprimanded by Riot Games for their part in multiple intentional disconnections, leading to penalties that have affected their standings in the official leaderboard.

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In itself, the intentional disconnections have no impact on the outcome of the games. However, as far as the community is concerned, intentionally leaving a game before completion signals anger and frustration, as well as being rude towards the opponents.

Kang “Cpt Jack” Hyung-woo, former AD Carry and current caster for League of Legends, took to Twitter yesterday to explain why so many players from South Korea are doing so.

Apparently it has nothing to do with emotions but rather a habit that the players have picked up over time. When professional teams scrim against each other, they often experiment with different compositions and strategies for upcoming official games.

There is a pact to not share any knowledge of those scrims with outside parties. Hence, in that light, players often disconnect intentionally before a game is concluded so that the official League of Legends servers are unable to save the game. This way, no one can download the recorded replay files and go through the past events.

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It is actually “customary for all 10 players to disconnect before the match is over” in South Korea. “99 percent of the time it is not the case,” he further clarified. “They are mistakes, do not misunderstand what is going on.”

However, that is still not an excuse for teams to go against rules set by Riot Games. Cpt Jack stated that players need to remind themselves of the difference between scrims and competitive matches. The current events are “wrong” and need to be stopped as it badly reflects on the professional scene.