Line of Sight Review: Bare Minimum for a F2P Shooter

By   /   Feb 2, 2017
line of sight

The shooter genre is saturated with so many ridiculous and repetitive games that it is hard to feel excited anymore. Battlefield 1 is the only shooter after Overwatch that managed to generate any sort of real (non-fanboy) excitement among the community.

The shooter formula is pretty simple these days, add some jetpacks and funky futuristic tools and you have a shooter. Modern day combat is neglected, real boots to the ground action are hard to find unless you get the Modern Warfare remastered or are interested in Counter Strike games.

Line of Sight Review

In such a redundant space, here comes a game that tries to bring back the boots on the ground, fast-paced action. The Line of Sight is simple with its mechanics and allows players the freedom to customize nearly every aspect of their weapons.

But Line of Sight feels like a cheap knock-off of Modern Warfare and Counter Strike. Even some of the maps from Line of Sight resemble classics such as wetwork from Modern Warfare.

For those who don’t know, Line of Sight is an online multiplayer shooter developed by a small independent team, Blackspot Entertainment. It is a free to play game that is now available on Steam.

Booting the game will take you to a simple tutorial which allows you a minute or two to familiarize with controls. There is nothing special or innovative here, your standard shooter controls.

Not being able to skip this tutorial is kind of annoying once you realize it isn’t teaching you anything new or different. Getting through the tutorial you finally reach the main menu where you have a range of different options at your disposal.

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There are a handful of different game modes including classics such as capture the flag, team death match.

Everything looks decent enough up to this point considering it is a free to play game so you decide to fire up your first game by hitting matchmaking. This is where disaster strikes you. Matchmaking is one of the major issues of this game.

First off, there aren’t many players online, at the time of this writing there are little over 500 so finding games for the desired mode will not only take some time, but you may end up being paired with mindless bots.

Instead of dividing and balancing teams equally, the algorithm puts all available players on one side while keeping the bots on the other team. Playing with bots is a challenging experience if you are playing Counter Strike, however, in Line of Sight you just end up feeling frustrated and not interested beyond the first few minutes.

The AI is horrible and can’t aim even if you stand right next to it. The situation is made worse by horrible spawn points and the fact that it is so easy to spawn camp. Maps are small, really small, and each team gets its own spawn point. That works in games with massive maps like Battlefield 1 but in Line of Sight, this spells disaster.

All you need is to push just enough so that a couple of your teammates are able to reach the spawn point (child’s play). Once a couple of you reach enemy spawn position it is like shooting a fish in the barrel most of the time. Other teammates join in and the competitive element is gone.

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You will find yourself standing in a corner with teammates, waiting for the enemy to spawn before you shoot. Without better dynamic spawn points, Line of Sight multiplayer can not work.

Snipers will have a field day with you during most of the matches. They sit in one position and aim for the enemy spawn positions where you will spawn over and over again, only to fall victim to the same snipers every time unless they miss.

The game promotes itself as the next-gen innovative FPS but nothing works in its favor. Guns are unbalanced, AI bots are bullet sponges, and besides duel mode there is not a single mode that helps boost engagement.

The feeling of playing a generic shooter never goes away and even though we want old school shooters like Modern Warfare, we want that theme and mechanics implemented correctly. For a small team, Line of Sight a big achievement and devs may make use of feedback to mold this into a better game.

Line of Sight mashes together all familiar shooter aspects and tries to create something new, failing in the process. Gunplay is generic and uninteresting, paranormal abilities that we use feel out of place and during most matches, you won’t even remember to use them.

Textures look bland, screen-tearing, anti-aliasing issues, texture popups, are just some of the graphical problems Line of Sight is currently facing.

Not all is bad here, the highlight of the game is its customization options. Even games like Call of Duty can learn a thing or two from Line of Sight. There is a surprisingly healthy variety of weapons and even more customization options. Nearly every aspect of your weapon can be customized to your liking.

You do a post-mortem of sorts, dissect a weapon, and replace many of its components. Player stats are highly detailed so you will know what, when, and how you have done things.

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Main menu, customization menu, and pretty much all of its UI feels overwhelming and poorly placed. However, that is nothing developers can’t handle via a few patches here and there.

Sound design is another lackluster aspect as gunfire noise doesn’t do anything to help weapons feel more realistic. You can download better sounds from freesound.org.

Microtransactions aren’t a pain and don’t really interfere with your gameplay. However, if you choose to buy gems in order to get more weapons, upgrades etc, your wallet will be drained, every penny squeezed out.

“Overpriced” is the word here.

Even as a free to play title, Line of Sight is just not worth it. It is the bare minimum you need for a shooter, it runs and you can shoot people; that’s it!

4.2
Even as a free to play title, Line of Sight is just not worth it.
5
Gameplay
4
Graphics
3
Story
5
Value