Blizzard Brings Down the Overwatch Ban Hammer in China Again

By   /   Dec 19, 2016

In yet another ban wave, Blizzard has brought down the Overwatch ban hammer on some Chinese hackers, banning more than 1800 players.

However, unlike those playing on US or EU servers, Blizzard China actually ends up releasing the names of players affected by the Overwatch ban hammer, to publicly humiliate those players on the game forums.

Some of those players, judging by their name tags as translated by Reddit, suggest they were actually proud of their hacking as is evident by one player with the Battle.net ID that says “This ain’t cheat this is skill”.

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Blizzard has brought down the Overwatch ban hammer multiple times in the past since the game launched in May this year. There have even been publicly released videos of players choosing sniper characters like Hanzo and then showing off their aimbot.

Unlike some other multiplayer games, bans in Overwatch are actually quite severe too. Instead of opting for a temporary suspension from playing, Blizzard permanently bans the player.

There have been reports that even when players bought new copies of the game to play without hacking, they were once again banned and couldn’t play until they changed their computer system.

While this extremely hard stance by the developers might suggest that players would be vary of such antics in the future, it doesn’t seem to deter the habitual hackers.

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In the past, there have been DDoS attacks on Blizzard servers when a new Overwatch ban hammer struck, preventing even the innocent ones from properly playing just because some hackers were salty for being banned.

Some of those hackers seem to adopt the stance that what Blizzard is doing is illegal since the player bought the copy of the game so it is up to them what they do with it, without actually realizing that they are playing in an online-only environment.

Perhaps a middle ground could be reached if Blizzard, instead of banning such hackers, decided to create a separate matchmaking system where those once flagged for hacking end up playing against other hackers.