Crytek Difficulties Pop Up Again, Employees Say They Aren’t Being Paid

By   /   Dec 13, 2016

When you’re a studio that’s made as much successful stuff as Crytek has, it’s always a surprise whenever Crytek difficulties pop up in the news. In this case, Crytek is once again having financial trouble, as employees of the developer are saying they haven’t been paid in at least two months.

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Crytek has had a problem like this before in 2014, which nearly caused the company to declare bankruptcy. Even though it managed to bring itself back from the edge, the Crytek difficulties caused the developer to cut 200 people from its staff, delay paychecks to workers, and sell off a number of assets. The studio also offloaded Homefront: The Revolution (which its UK studio had been making) to Deep Silver, which had then screwed up by releasing Homefront in a poor state.

Even before the employees hadn’t been getting paid, apparently paychecks were delayed by several weeks for the last few months. Apparently, money for October that was intended for employees won’t be given out until early December, so who knows if Crytek has actually paid its employees in the past two weeks.

This is also effecting all of Crytek, not just its main Frankfurt branch; there are even rumors that Crytek will be selling its Bulgaria-based Black Sea studio, who made the free-to-play MOBA called “Arena of Fate.”

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The Crytek difficulties lately may be because of the studio making a shift from traditional retail-sold video games to free-to-play games, where income is dependent on how much people spend money on microtransactions. The studio also recently released two VR games: one is the mountain-climbing simulator called “The Climb” for the Oculus Rift, and the other is Robinson: The Journey for Playstation VR.

Hopefully Crytek can survive this new period of financial instability, preferably without having to fire any more of their staff.