Red Dead Redemption 2 Development Apparently Began In 2014

By   /   Nov 22, 2016
Red Dead Redemption 2 development

Rumors that Red Dead Redemption 2 was coming out in various years after the first game came out have been widespread for a long time, but now it seems that, according to a sound designer website, that Red Dead Redemption 2 development apparently began in 2014, a surprising two years ago or even slightly farther back.

See Also: Take Two “Laser Focused” On Quality of Red Dead Redemption 2

According to the website, which belongs to the sound designer Joe Cavers, he had been working with the Red Dead Redemption 2 development team for around two years, alongside other games he’d helped make such as Grand Theft Auto 5, Batman: Arkham Knight, and two different Lego games: Lego Batman 2, and Lego Harry Potter: Years 5-7.

While that information has since been removed, it does point toward the possibility of Red Dead Redemption 2 having been in development for much longer than we thought. When it comes out in the fall of next year (provided that Rockstar doesn’t delay it for some reason), this means that it would have been developed for around three years, the normal sort of dev time for a triple A game.

However, by the time that Red Dead Redemption 2 development is done, it would have been 7 years since the last Red Dead game came out, with four coming out between Red Dead Redemption’s first release and when development on the game began.

Considering that Rockstar began work on Grand Theft Auto 5 in 2009, only a year after Grand Theft Auto 4 came out, it’s quite the difference between one year and four.

The reason behind the increased gap between development time for GTA 5 and Red Dead Redemption 2, however, is likely related to the technology level of the games. While Grand Theft Auto 5 was released for the Xbox 360 at first, the work was already being done on it to port it over to next-gen consoles.

Red Dead Redemption 2 development may have been delayed so long so that Rockstar could take advantage of the increased power of current-gen systems.