Ubisoft Is Cancelling Ghost Recon Phantoms and Mighty Quest for Epic Loot

By   /   Aug 27, 2016
Ghost Recon Phantoms and Mighty Quest

Ubisoft has announced that today they will be shutting down Ghost Recon Phantoms and Mighty Quest for Epic Loot, two free-to-play games owned by them. According to Ubisoft itself, the reason for the shutdowns is that neither game was as successful as they had hoped for, and so the games are going down.

Ghost Recon Phantoms was Ubisoft’s first foray into the free-to-play market, and has been running for over four years. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to have picked up enough players in those four years for Ubisoft to be able to justify keeping it running, even though it hit 8 million back in 2014. The game will shut down on December 1.

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Mighty Quest for Epic Loot was Ubisoft’s combination dungeon-crawling and base-building game, where players would create a castle and fill it with traps and monsters to thwart thieves that would attack the castle and try to rob you. While it also enjoyed modest success, and ran for three years, it will also be shutting down in October.

Ghost Recon Phantoms and Mighty Quest for Epic Loot will both be shutting down so that Ubisoft can focus on other, more profitable projects, but what those are remains to be seen.

Ghost Recon Phantoms and Mighty Quest aren’t the only free-to-play games that have been shut down recently, either. Microsoft also shut down its Russia-only free-to-play shooter Halo Online, which hadn’t even gotten a full release yet.

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Whatever comes for Ubisoft now that they’ve shut down two of their free-to-play games will probably end up remaining triple-A and without constant server maintenance, especially if the company can’t get enough interest in free-to-play games to justify them being developed. Mighty Quest was certainly inventive, but that won’t really help if the game isn’t popular.

Maybe Ubisoft should try something more mainstream, like a free-to-play Assassin’s Creed game, where you could run your own Brotherhood of Assassins across the world.