Madden NFL 25 Connected Franchise Tips and Strategy Guide

Once you select the Be a Player career, you will have the option of playing as a real-life player on any team, select a Hall of Fame legend you may have unlocked in Madden Ultimate Team, or you could go on and create a player of your own. If you’re creating your own player, you will need to select his position, team, and his backstory.

Picking a Position
Of the various things you will be selecting, the position is arguably the most important. This is obviously the most critical part of any player’s career, and it’s no different in Madden NFL 25.

Picking your position not only sets the tone of how you will be playing, but also how much impact you have in seasons and in your team’s performance.

Positions like quarterback and running back on offense, or linebacker and defensive lineman on defense give you the most time to make a difference on the field.

These are the ideal positions for most players, but veterans who would like a challenge can take on the role of a receiver or safety, though you won’t have as much of an impact on the team’s performance as you would otherwise.

Once you have chosen which position you want to play, there are a few archetypes to choose from. So, if, for example, you wanted to play as a Quarterback, you could choose a Balanced QB, or West Coast QB, or any of the other variations that are available.

Backstory
Like with the coach, you will have to select a backstory for your created player. This backstory will determine two main things: your initial rating, and the difficulty of your seasonal goals. The higher the rating, the more the expectations from you, so though it maybe natural to select a High Draft pick, you’ll have to consider whether you are up for the seasonal goals or not.

There are three backstories to choose from, described as follows:

High Draft:
As a high draft pick, your team is banking on you for its future. Your ratings will be in the High 70s or mid 80s, and your goals will be reflective of what the team expects from you. Depending on the team you choose and your position, you could start off immediately, or wait till the mid or end of the first season.

This backstory will probably put you into the action most immediately, and is thus the number one choice. Just make sure you are prepared for relatively demanding seasonal goals.

Low Draft:
Your team is taking a chance on you, simply because the coach believes he has spotted that special-something. It’s time to prove him correct, even though you’ll start off with ratings in the low 70s.

Your goals will be demanding, and you will have to work very hard to get into the season early on. This is a choice ideal for veterans who want a challenge. You will also get the most playing time with this backstory.

Undrafted:
As a cheap roster-filler, you will be rated in the high 60s or low 70s. It will be very difficult for you to make it, even in the second year of entry.

You’ll have to spend a large amount of time just staring at your screen, watching the simulations go on without your active participation. Your goals will be easier, but you won’t be able to achieve any if you are just warming the benches.

It’s hard to say why anyone would want to pick an undrafted backstory, unless they want to torture themselves or have a lot of time to waste.

Picking a Team
Once you’ve finalized your position and backstory, it’s time to make an impact.

Most of us would choose the team that we support, but sometimes it can actually be a bad choice. It is important to analyze the teams according to the playing position you chose, so you can fit in the team more easily.

For this reason, it is best to choose a team that lacks a good player in the position that you will be playing. If you think in this manner, there is an easy way to categorize the teams that are good for each position in the following way:

Quarterback
CLE, JAX, KC, MIN, TEN

Halfback
DET, GB, NE, TB, WAS

Wide Receiver
BAL, CAR, DEN, DET, NO

Tight End
CHI, DEN, NYG, PHI, PIT

Defensive End
CAR, CIN, JAX, TB, TEN

Linebacker
BAL, MIN, NYG, PHI, TB

Cornerback
BAL, DET, NE, NO, PIT

Safety
DET, HOU, GB, NE, PHI

Goals
Now that you’ve jumped into the real-deal with your player position, backstory, and team defined, it’s time to prepare yourself for some weekly activities. As soon as the season begins, you’ll be given various goals by the owner of your team.

If you are a High Draft pick, and for some odd reason you selected a bad team, your goals will be very challenging.

If you’re a Low Draft player, you’ll have it relatively easy, but with a good team there’s a chance you won’t be getting much attention at all. You can check the goals for your season under the My Career tab, along with the Legacy score and experience.

Every year, you will be given four seasonal goals. You need to accomplish at least the level two goal to keep your job, or else you can say bye-bye to your career.

Goals are arranged in order of difficulty, so generally the last goal will probably be the most challenging. Every year is different, with expectations from you raising or lowering according to your performance, but on average, you can expect goals to become tougher as you complete more seasons.

You won’t directly earn XP when you complete the goal, but will instead gain an accumulative reward towards the end of the season, depending on the number of goals you completed.

Apart from your primary seasonal goals, you’ll also be presented with weekly goals and Milestones. Weekly goals concern your immediate next game, whenever applicable. They will grant you minor XP, and though they can be ignored, they’re a great method of accumulating experience points to develop your player.

Milestones are quite different on the other hand, they are more like Achievements and Trophies, and many of them are ridiculously difficult. Since they have the potential to get in the way and hinder your enjoyment, it is actually best to ignore these altogether – let them come naturally to you themselves.

Remember, you can achieve 100% completion even without Milestones, so no need to sweat.

Weekly Activities
Once you have a grasp of what you need to accomplish during your first year, you will be indulged for the reason of the season in iterative weekly activities.

These activities will not only impact you and your team immediately, but also allow both to build up for the long term. Thankfully, Weekly Activities in Be a Player are only limited to you, so you don’t need to worry too much about management issues and sort out issues of whining players.

Practice
Before Madden 13, practice was just really just what it means – a thing you could do to learn and improve your skills. It was natural to ignore this after a few initial tries, because actual matches were more beneficial.

But everything’s changed now, as you can actually gain XP by practicing! This is a great and cheap method of gaining some XP, but you might not want to do it every week – it can get quite tedious! Losing a practice still gives you 1000 XP, but winning will reward you with double the amount. There’s actually a potential to earn 42,000 XP by the time the season ends with practices alone.

If you selected a Low Draft, you’ll find yourself practicing a lot more often, since AI coaches will only select you based on your rating. So, in order to raise your attributes, you’ll need to practice regularly and spend the earned XP to improve your character.

There is no other way than this for Low Draft or Undrafted players during the course of the season. Yes, you may get some games in the pre-season, but the main session is very different. High Draft players won’t have too much issue, especially if they’ve been clever in picking a team that needed a good player in the position they opted for.

Progressing Your Player
Depending on the League settings, players can progress themselves every week or at the end of a season. If you have the option of progressing every week, consider doing it by going to the Buy Upgrades option from the Home screen.

Your performance will mainly dictate how much XP you gain per week, so you should consider playing your games and doing plenty of practice if you plant to take your player to the top.

Also, it is important to prioritize certain attributes that would complement your playstyle and position. However, this does not mean you should completely ignore all the attributes – try sticking to a balanced approach, while prioritizing the main traits.

Game Day
If you’re lucky and have been selected for the Game, you’ll get to play on the main team. If you are playing online and your opponent is a human-controlled team, they will get an alert. For AI, you will need to give one single confirmation.

Playing every game can be tedious though, especially against teams weaker than yours which have little chance to win. For this reason, you’ll find yourself simulating many games. Make sure though, that you play the essential games to ensure your team progresses onwards.

When you’re actually playing the game, it’s best to tailor your game-style to support the player you created.

This will ensure that your player gets the maximum exposure and the best chance to make a huge (positive) impact on the team’s performance. Though you will have control over most things, you cannot control depth chart, injuries, coach calls, or the ability to switch players.

Don’t forget to share your own tips and strategies with us by commenting below!

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By Haider Khan

One of the long time staff at SegmentNext, Haider is an integral part of the team with a love for writing, playing guitar, and aviation. Apart from writing for us, Haider is also a competitive FPS player and also enjoys exotic RPG games like Diablo and Xenogears (his favorite game of all time) on the side.

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